The Tunican Chapter of the Arkansas Archeological Society and the Drew County Historical Society are holding another series of joint meetings this spring.

The first in the series, a discussion about the New York African Burial Ground, will be held on February 7 at 6:30 p.m. in the conference room of the School of Forestry and Natural Resources at the University of Arkansas at Monticello.

In recognition of African American history month, Dr. Susan Goode-Null will discuss the New York African Burial Ground, a cemetery in Lower Manhattan where both free and enslaved Africans were buried from the 1690s until 1794.

She will discuss the ways historical archeology can expand the understanding of the lives of enslaved Africans during the early colonial period and the impact of the slave regime on the health and wellbeing of the infants and children of New York.

Dr. Goode Null is a physical anthropologist specializing in the bioarchaeology of children and slavery. She became interested in this topic as an undergraduate at the University of Oklahoma and they solidified while she was employed as an osteological technician on the New York African Burial Ground Project at Howard University. Dr. Goode-Null did her graduate work at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst where she furthered her studies and gained expertise in human growth and development, demography, and pathology.

The Tunican Chapter of the Arkansas Archeological Society is a group of people interested in the archeology and history of Arkansas. Members work with the UAM Research Station of the Arkansas Archeological Survey to document and preserve Arkansas’s cultural heritage and to foster and encourage interest in the preservation of sites and artifacts.

The Drew County Historical Society is interested in preserving the heritage of Drew County.

Together, the two organizations will hold a monthly speaker series on the first Tuesday of each month through Spring 2017 semester. These events are also sponsored by the School of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Arkansas at Monticello and the UAM Research Station of the Arkansas Archeological Survey.

The event is free and open to the public. Teachers can receive continuing education credit for attending this event.