Diana-Angelo 1

Commonly referred to by anthropologists as the Cradle of Mankind, Kenya holds an unsurpassed record of human prehistory spanning over 27 million years.

At the May meeting of the Tunican Chapter of the Arkansas Archeological Society, Diana Rose Angelo, an archeologist with the U.S. Forest Service, will talk about Lake Turkana, Kenya, a United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization World Heritage site.

The meeting, which is free and open to the public, will be held on May 1 at 6:30 p.m. in the conference room of the School of Forestry and Natrual Resources at the University of Arkansas at Monticello.

During the summer of 2017, Angelo attended the Turkana Basin Institute to participate in a workshop with a host of scientists including Richard and Meave Leakey, primatologist Lawrence Martin, geologists Frank Brown and Craig Feibel, and evolutionary biologist Dino Martins.

Angelo will talk about her travel to famous paleoanthropological discovery sites, the geological areas and biological ecosystems around Lake Turkana, and the traditional cultures of the people who make this desert landscape their home.

Angelo is the district archaeologist for the Jessieville/Winona/Fourche District of the Ouachita National Forest. She also teaches biological anthropology at the University of Arkansas Little Rock. She received her M.A. in Anthropology from the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville.

The Tunican Chapter of the Arkansas Archeological Society is a group of people interested in the archeology and history of Arkansas. Members work with the UAM Research Station of the Arkansas Archeological Survey to document and preserve Arkansas’s cultural heritage and to foster and encourage interest in the preservation of sites and artifacts. The Chapter holds a monthly speaker series on the first Tuesday of each month through the Spring 2018 semester. These events are also sponsored by the School of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Arkansas at Monticello and the UAM Research Station of the Arkansas Archeological Survey.

The Tunican Chapter of the Arkansas Archeological Society is a group of people interested in the archeology and history of Arkansas. Members work with the UAM Research Station of the Arkansas Archeological Survey to document and preserve Arkansas’s cultural heritage and to foster and encourage interest in the preservation of sites and artifacts.

The chapter holds a monthly speaker series on the first Tuesday of each month through the Spring 2018 semester. These events are also sponsored by the School of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Arkansas at Monticello and the UAM Research Station of the Arkansas Archeological Survey.

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